7 Comments

  1. veronica
    September 10, 2017 @ 11:19 am

    In 2 hours I start my solo journey to The Arctic to join a 40metre boat with 13 other photographers – all strangers. So much of your advice reinforced where I mentally wish to be…albeit not city life!
    This trip is an adventure I have dreamed of – so late in life I decided to do it!
    Thanks for sweeping away my last minute anxious thoughts. Regretfully as no internet on board I cannot access your blogs to keep me tethered to my creativity when it gets tough.
    Love all your references/links and look forward to reading more when I return

    Reply

    • Epes
      September 14, 2017 @ 2:20 pm

      Hi Veronica

      I bet you’re freezing right now! At least you’re in a magical place having an awesome time. If you read this reply on your return please let me know how it went and share some photos with us. I would love to see them. It is a place I’ve also dream about going. Artic at Dawn…haha.
      All the best
      Anthony

      Reply

  2. Paul
    September 10, 2017 @ 1:03 pm

    Fantastic blog here Anthony and the images are outstanding!! That’s for all your time and your knowledge!! 🙂

    Reply

    • Epes
      September 14, 2017 @ 2:17 pm

      Hi Paul
      I am glad you are enjoying the blog and the photos. Di and I aim are very grateful to our followers here at Cities at Dawn. I personally enjoy teaching because it reminds me of all the stuff I forgot over the years! lol. Keeping me young!
      All the best
      Anthony

      Reply

  3. Sophie Taglialegne
    September 13, 2017 @ 1:24 pm

    Hi Anthony and Diana,
    This article is great. Another one!
    I am at work so I hv just read and enjoyed the first part that came in my in-box some days ago. I will definitively read the rest a home, or lose my job!
    I will print this article or summarize the essential parts and ideas in my “photography” notebook as I always to with yr stuff.
    In part one, what interested me most is the idea you developed on engaging with the locals: give not just take. I never saw it from that perspective maybe it is just something I/we do not get to think. Always in the rush of things. The next time I will for sure put this into practice.
    Then another idea that made me reflect is to slow down. Before this photography process I used to try to get the best out of travelling meaning get all the information in before departure date (guide books, maps, websites) and then go from place to place with a to do check-list (I did go into depth into each place though!). It was like if I had to tick the place I was visiting out of my list to make room for the next travel. Why? Time and money. Hard to make time due to job polities and travelling is expensive. Maybe you are right and I will try to experiment this too. Thank you for putting forward these ideas.
    Until next…

    Reply

    • Epes
      September 14, 2017 @ 2:14 pm

      Hi Sophie

      I love it when people print my articles to share or just have around the house. 🙂
      It was being in Cuba that the idea of giving back and not just taking solidified in me. I feel it is a good way to live. Being grateful is very powerful stuff and makes one feel more connected. I truly believe that.
      Be well.
      Anthony
      PS SLOW DOWN.YES.GOOD!… not that you might miss a shot, but you may miss out on some joy!

      Reply

  4. John Tollefsen
    September 23, 2017 @ 9:57 am

    I’ve recently returned from a trip to the Hungarian-speaking part of Transilvania, photographing small-scale producers of foods and drinks and artisans. Besides staying and eating locally and using local guides, I also left one postcard of the town where I live to everyone we visited. They seemed to like it even though I think my town is nothing special, having been more or less conquered by asphalt, concrete and international chains.

    I agree that light is very important when you are photographing, but there is not much you can do when about it when you photograph people at work. I just had to accept whatever light they were working in apart from one time when I had to pull the curtains across a window because the contrasts due to sunlight were far too great.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Download my inspiring ebook

...and learn the two most essential lessons I can teach you about photography. It will inspire you, transform your creativity and kick your motivation into gear. It's free and you'll also get my weekly newsletter.

    No spam & we wont share your email ever.  
No thanks, I'm inspired enough :)
Simple Share Buttons