Diana Bird

16 Comments

  1. Marcia Clement
    October 18, 2019 @ 5:48 pm

    I’ve gone from a DSLR to a mirrorless because of the size and weight while travelling. I hadn’t done much with my smartphone, an IPhone 7 until I went to Ireland in September. I decided I would challenge myself to use only my IPhone while I was in Dublin, thinking that when I rented a car I would use my mirrorless because I could just pull it out whenever I stopped. However, to my surprise, I found my IPhone so much handier that I ended up using it 95% of the whole trip. The only downside (if you can call it that) was that while I am by no means a professional photographer, I felt even less so when I was just one more of the crowd holding up a smartphone!! I suspect that in the future unless I intend to be photographing wildlife, for example, where a good zoom lens is useful, I will travel with just my IPhone which is so much more compact and useful for so many other things.

    Marcia Clement
    Ottawa, Canada

    Reply

    • Anthony Epes
      October 25, 2019 @ 7:05 am

      Honestly, I feel the same way about looking just like another amateur with a camera phone. I think i am over it now because of my technique, which is to not stand or be near anyone else who is taking pictures…makes me feel better about being a photographer. Superior even! Haha 🙂
      You have a very nice camera. DO NOT abandone it yet!!

      Reply

  2. Alison Wishart
    October 18, 2019 @ 6:10 pm

    Hi Anthony – loved this article ! I don’t use my phone as much as I should (and after enjoying this article I plan to make more of an effort). I find the phone awkward to handle as a camera and with the screen glare it feels a bit less under control . Alison

    Reply

    • Anthony Epes
      October 25, 2019 @ 7:01 am

      I think screen glare and actually seeing what is in the frame is the toughest bit about using a phone as camera. That and the serious lack of depth of field control ( soon to be fixed im sure). Glad you liked the article.

      Reply

  3. Sandra
    October 18, 2019 @ 6:33 pm

    I have stopped using my camera altogether now that I have the P20 Pro. I get much better images from my phone and can edit and post on the fly. The only time I ever printed photos was for photography course assignments, so I’m not worried about losing that quality.
    Traveling with only a phone camera is liberating and makes one less of a target in sketchy areas. I always use a wrist tether to deter theft and lessen the possibility of dropping my phone.

    Reply

    • Anthony Epes
      October 25, 2019 @ 6:59 am

      What camera did you decide to abandone for a phone?…(this is the future people! Just what I said in the article, like it or not it has begun!)
      🙂

      Reply

  4. Mary Newth
    October 18, 2019 @ 7:38 pm

    Anthony…..

    I shoot with my Nikon when I go out for a shooting adventure and to do small set up indoors. I also walk 15 miles a week for exercise. I carry my iPhone to track my miles and use the camera while I walk. I have found that my “seeing” skills have improved greatly because there is nothing else to do when I’m walking but look around and think. I edit my iPhone photos with Snap Seed which works much like Lightroom, so I also get editing practice. I have gotten some really awesome photos over time. If I see something worth the trip back I try to recapture it in my camera.

    Reply

    • Anthony Epes
      October 25, 2019 @ 6:56 am

      That sounds like a very peaceful and practical experience. How many times has it worked going back to capture it with your camera? I find success there very elusive.

      Reply

  5. Lisa
    October 19, 2019 @ 4:23 am

    Hi! I’m intrigued by your article. At this point, the only digital camera I own is built into my $100 smartphone. Is it a great camera? Not by any stretch of the imagination. However, it has stretched MY imagination, trying to improve my limited photography skills with nothing but a smartphone. Surprisingly, some of my photos have actually been good enough printed as 8×10’s to win first, second, or third place at our local fair. I doubt that even the best ones would print well any larger than that.

    There are some obvious advantages, of course, to using a smartphone camera (even a cheap one like mine), but I feel rather handicapped. I’m really looking forward to getting a DSLR, so that I can learn more about and practice both the technical and the creative aspects of good photography. ☺

    Reply

    • Anthony Epes
      October 25, 2019 @ 6:54 am

      What i would like to know is – what is the maximum recommended print size for these phone cameras? With 35mm film it was 5×7 inch, though printing much larger, like 16×20, still gave great results.
      I guess we have to go by the megapixel rule just like you would with a DSLR, but for some reason that does not seem right to me. The reason being – smartphones do not pick up much detail with their tiny sensors but can still be 10+ megapixels. There should be another standard here! Anyone, Bueller, anyone…

      Reply

  6. Dawn Penso
    October 19, 2019 @ 8:38 pm

    I used my smartphone exclusively on a trip to Guatemala with a friend about 18 months ago. Unfortunately she dropped her camera the day we arrived and had no backup camera so I loaned her my compact zoom and used my phone, the intention being to take it back after a day or two. Well of course I couldn’t really be that unkind so used the smartphone for all my shots. It was a great experience, I had to think much more about composition, where to stand, and was truly amazed at the quality of the shots, some taken in relatively low light in the forests of the highlands. I like the idea of smartphones taking the place of mirror less cameras, although I’m delighted with my Fuji system, but weight and convenience are winning features.

    Reply

    • Anthony Epes
      October 25, 2019 @ 6:46 am

      You are a much kinder person than me Dawn. I would want my camera back right away…and give my friend my phone! 🙂

      Reply

  7. Ralph Rinke
    October 20, 2019 @ 3:43 am

    Hello Anthony,

    I enjoyed your article and especially the moving car photo, nice.

    I’ve been using my iphone for a number of years now and find it very liberating and rewarding.

    I have enough resolution to print my images in platinum/palladium and cyanotype. I do print small and over mat, but enjoy using the “camera” at hand.

    With everything online these days, you really don’t need much more if all you do is post to the web.

    If you’re interested in my iphone pics, have a look – https://www.instagram.com/ralphrinke/, they were all taken with my iphone except one.

    Again, enjoyed the article.

    Reply

    • Anthony Epes
      October 25, 2019 @ 6:44 am

      Hi Ralph

      Very interesting comment you made. Are you saying you are making platinum/palladium prints from a smartphone?? How do you get them to the negative state?

      Reply

  8. Lisa
    November 5, 2019 @ 2:34 pm

    Good question. Some time ago, I remember seeing a chart showing the megapixels needed for various print sizes, and it left me very confused, because it just didn’t seem to work that way with my phone camera. I later recall reading a post explaining that the pixels/megapixels on a DSLR and those on a smartphone are not created equal due to the size of the sensors. So back to square one…

    At any rate, the only sizes I’ve ever attempted to print are 4×6, 5×7, and 8×10. The 8×10’s have given me mixed results, but those with much sky in the background are often quite grainy when printed at that size. I imagine, though, that the more expensive phones would do a better job than my economy model.

    This may or may not be of value in answering the question, but the available picture sizes on my particular phone are as follows:

    4:3 (5.0M) 2576×1932
    4:3 (3.1M) 2048×1536
    16:9 (3.7M) 2560×1440
    16:9 (2.4M) 2048×1152
    1:1 (3.7M) 1920×1920

    Maybe a dumb question, but does the M stand for meters? And how exactly do I use that information? 🤔

    Reply

    • Lisa
      November 5, 2019 @ 2:38 pm

      Oops! Let me try that again:

      4:3 (5.0M) 2576×1932
      4:3 (3.1M) 2048×1536
      16:9 (3.7M) 2560×1440
      16:9 (2.4M) 2048×1152
      1:1 (3.7M) 1920×1920

      Reply

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