Diana Bird

16 Comments

  1. debbie
    October 14, 2017 @ 11:36 am

    More enticing shots Anthony. And I love that cushions in the light one.
    Another favourite is the woman who seems to be wearing the street sign as a hat.
    Your looking up header photo looks almost exactly the same as one that I just fell in love with and had to buy the book! Have you sen it? It’s in Rough Guide’s new photography book “You are Here”

    Reply

    • Epes
      October 15, 2017 @ 2:33 am

      The header photo is of the Montane Estate in Quarry Bay. Every photographer worth their salt goes there to get this image. And I totally understand why – It’s totally weird, weird and beautiful. I’m taking the group there just to see it and will ask them to do something original. haha! I tried. Turns out this is by far the best angle. Not easy to get though – may cause very sore neck and super tripod skills!

      Haven’t seen that book yet.

      Reply

  2. Maria Pereira
    October 14, 2017 @ 12:44 pm

    How right you are. Progress and environmental impact. I love it.

    Reply

    • Epes
      October 15, 2017 @ 2:34 am

      See. I was right. Maria says so.

      Reply

  3. Sheena
    October 14, 2017 @ 4:44 pm

    What an amazing blog, and it applies across all parts of life, not just the creative bits. I know there are things that have to be done whether we are inspired or not, but so many people fill their lives with “I should”, and lose out on the fun of exploring something. A quote from Neil Gaiman too! Thank you

    Reply

    • Epes
      October 15, 2017 @ 2:37 am

      Thank you Sheena. It’s all connected I think. Everything. I just started reading Gaiman this year. Trippy dude. Full of wonderful imagination in his prose.

      Reply

  4. Des McSweeney
    October 14, 2017 @ 5:25 pm

    I’m with Di of course on pipes and high rise 😉

    Reply

    • Diana Bird
      October 14, 2017 @ 5:39 pm

      Yes! It’s amazing how people can see such different things in one photo.

      Reply

    • Epes
      October 15, 2017 @ 2:38 am

      Fine. I don’t mind you both being wrong 😉

      Reply

  5. Lisa
    August 22, 2019 @ 2:48 pm

    I see a juxtaposition of raw and finished, but I can see it from your perspective, as well. One doesn’t usually see in photos of a city skyline all the debris that is left behind from the making of said city.

    Reply

    • Diana Bird
      August 31, 2019 @ 2:35 pm

      Thanks Lisa. Yes I think the contrast of the subject is very interesting. There is so much that we do as humans that ends up discarded, and showing it all is pretty fascinating. Although I am still not crazy about this shot 😉

      Reply

  6. Photo Challenge: Your best photo 100 metres from your home (or work) - Anthony Epes
    August 29, 2019 @ 4:25 pm

    […] Letting go of judging your photography […]

    Reply

  7. Mary Newth
    August 29, 2019 @ 4:50 pm

    I like the pipes with the city but I would crop it off just below the pipes on the right.
    I’m not nuts about the length of the red pipe.
    Just another opinion.

    Reply

  8. Diana Bird
    August 31, 2019 @ 2:33 pm

    Thanks Mary. Yes the red pipe looks so odd to me 😉 Anthony loves it though – photography is so subjective. I love that we all have such different opinions about this photo.

    Reply

  9. Robert
    January 21, 2020 @ 1:04 am

    Hello Anthony and Di, I enjoy reading about and following your travels.
    Regarding the “marital dispute” photo; I think in a way Di is correct, however good composition can ‘pull’ almost any mess of subject matter into a coherent image that has the potential to set up a dialogue between the artist and viewer.
    Each time I view this image, I find myself interpreting it differently. I see metaphors for progress, both as a glorious vision and as encroaching (rampaging?) threat. Then I became aware of the equally divided frame at the horizon line and it reminded me of photographs I have seen by underwater photographers where the surface of the water becomes the horizon line dividing the frame; the quality of lighting in this image further adds to this interpretation (for me at least). Seeing it as a 2D image turns it in to two separate images (diptych), but when looking at as a photograph of 3D subject matter, one tends to interpret it differently.
    Thank you for challenge, and I wish you well in your travels, I’m deeply envious; perhaps that is another topic you can write about; ‘photographer-lifestyle envy’;).

    Reply

    • Diana Bird
      January 23, 2020 @ 6:18 pm

      Hi Robert – thank you! I agree with you that I am correct 🙂 Thank you for your kinds words

      Reply

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