19 Comments

  1. Donna Roberge
    March 10, 2016 @ 3:57 am

    Thanks Anthony, I always enjoy reading your articles.

    Im also very inspired by beautiful light. My favorite is the milky white light that you get sometimes when the sky is covered by a thin white layer of clouds and the sun only shines through weakly… It bathes everything in this amazing milky white shimmery light.
    I have a hard time capturing the light with my camera the way that I see it. Most often I’m disappointed when I look at the photos.

    Thanks again for taking the time to post these helpful articles.

    Reply

    • Anthony Epes
      April 18, 2016 @ 3:59 pm

      HI Donna
      If you’re having trouble capturing that elusive light it may be because of technical issues such as aperture, lens choice or just bloody elusive light! Keep at it. Understand what your light meter is trying to tell you and adjust from there. On my workshops I really try to make people understand that knowing how to interpret the meter is the best way in capturing ambiance and feeling.
      For that milky white sky try over exposing with +1.5EV. Let me know how it goes.
      🙂

      Reply

  2. Joshua Raif
    March 26, 2016 @ 9:14 am

    Dear Anthony,
    I have only recently subscribed to your blog and am enjoying it tremendously. You have a great way of capturing and transferring the spiritual aspect of photography. I am sure you are a great inspiration to many photographers around the world.
    Thank you for sharing.
    All the best,
    Joshua

    Reply

    • Anthony Epes
      April 18, 2016 @ 3:53 pm

      Thank you Joshua. That really means a lot to me. Photography is my first love. Sharing and teaching is also…my first love! Shoot with passion and no wrong will come of it only great images.

      Reply

  3. Cecilia
    March 30, 2016 @ 1:01 pm

    Thanks for your sharing Anthony. I could actually “see” that beautiful Plane tree in the sunlight! Those moments always take my breath away too. I love your shots of tree in the mist and the Seagulls too, not for the technical mastery, but for the emotion it evokes. I took a shot recently of water birds, a line of Red capped Plovers in front of lines of Sanderlings and other bigger birds along the shore. It wasn’t a sharp image, but I absolutely love it as you see hundreds of little legs of various colours and sharp beaks at all angles with abstract looking soft bodies in between. Then they took off and I got another “abstract art” image with some sharp and some blurry shapes with wings beating at all speeds and all shapes. I’m thinking of printing it out on canvas. I love nature but really “see” whenever I have the camera with me. There is beauty everywhere and the right light makes it magical.

    Reply

    • Anthony Epes
      April 18, 2016 @ 3:51 pm

      Well said Cecilia! You’ve just inspired me!

      And yes, do print it. There is most definitely not enough printing going on anymore.

      Reply

  4. Donna Roberge
    April 23, 2016 @ 5:51 am

    Thanks Anthony, the next time I see this kind of light Ill try over-exposing…. Thanks for the tip!

    Reply

  5. Clemencia Angel
    April 24, 2016 @ 3:13 pm

    Dear Mr. Epes: Thanks a lot for the lessons your sending me. I love the way you teach and write. Sincerely, Clemencia Angel

    Reply

    • Anthony Epes
      April 26, 2016 @ 11:45 am

      Hi Clemencia

      Thank you. I love what I do and I think it shows.

      Reply

  6. Virginia
    August 10, 2016 @ 6:56 am

    I always love reading your articles! Your passion shines through and your pictures and words inspire me to grab my camera and try harder! This article was very timely for me, too, since I’ve been having the debate with myself about the fact that I have trouble conveying what I’m seeing (light, color, etc) and rely heavier on post-production than I necessarily want to. I’ve decided it’s fine for now. The photos are for me and I want to vividly remember these moments. But with hard work behind the lens, maybe I won’t need to do as much in front of the screen!

    Reply

  7. Jon Lipinski
    January 8, 2017 @ 10:45 pm

    Thank you Anthony for your fascinating article on light! I found it so invigorating and exciting. I now feel quite ashamed of myself because I didn’t get out and shoot any photos today as it was cold and wet. I promise to get out tomorrow – after the shopping trip!!!

    Reply

  8. David Brown
    March 20, 2018 @ 10:24 am

    Anthony, after reading your article I know I am going to have to re-read it again and maybe again to take in all you say. However I am realising that there are so many more kinds of light than I have always imagined. It will take patience and waiting for the changes in the light to get that elusive picture that somehow you know is there if only you wait for the moment. Thank you for these thought provoking articles, so interesting and enjoyable. You are truly one of a kind!

    Reply

    • Epes
      April 18, 2018 @ 3:35 pm

      Hi David

      I’ve re-read all my favourite books many times and I never thought once that it was a waste of time. Thank you for your comment. There is always so much more to glean if you are paying attention . Light is no exception, in fact, I feel light is in a category all its own. It’s presence and energy reach into us in ways that can be thought of as manipulative but benevolent. It really is more than just “brightness” !!

      🙂

      Reply

  9. Anne
    October 27, 2018 @ 4:10 am

    Anthony, thank you for a revelatory – for me – article. I had not stopped to consider light evoking specific feelings; but of course it does. I love the way photographers sometimes sign off by wishing each other ‘good light’!

    Reply

    • Epes
      November 6, 2018 @ 1:05 pm

      Thank you! That’s super kind of you to say. Light for me is EVERYTHING in photography. Have you started to shoot differently when thinking about light now?

      Reply

  10. Stephen Eather
    December 4, 2018 @ 11:22 pm

    Thanks so much for sharing this article on light. I really appreciated your “realness” when discussing your passion and the encouragement for us to look at light in different terms. I read some years ago that the 2 main areas to focus on (pardon the pun!) for budding photographers was light and to have patience – you have confirmed this in your post.
    Thanks also for your free ebook, it’s great.
    Wishing you well from Brisbane Australia, go well mate,
    Steve
    Insta: photo_by_steve

    Reply

  11. Dimitris Lamproulis
    January 2, 2019 @ 10:39 am

    Dear Epes,

    You are an inspired photographer and that evades from your articles as well. In fact, I see myself turning to a great fan of your photography. I like your comments and the simplicity that you use to pass them across.

    Thank you for your contribution to my photographic art. I don’t consider myself yet a fully competent photographer. But, your help stands up that inspires my efforts. Thank you for that.

    In fact, I plan to send you some pics of mine, at some point hoping to share the same feelings.

    With best friendly regards,
    Dr. Dimitris Lamproulis.

    Reply

    • Epes
      January 4, 2019 @ 12:09 pm

      Thank you so much Dimitris! You made my day. I feel so grateful to you for making me feel my time is well spent helping creatives!
      Please do send me your images.

      Reply

  12. angie collings
    October 11, 2019 @ 12:57 pm

    Just received the first of your articles by email, this one relating to light. Thank you so much – its a fabulous read, and living in the countryside here in England, I do notice very much the changing light – but really should get up much earlier, at dawn! Can I just say I really love all the quotations too!

    Reply

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