13 Comments

  1. Vansh
    December 15, 2015 @ 7:51 am

    thanks! very informative.

    Reply

  2. Delos Craft
    February 7, 2016 @ 6:21 pm

    You have brought me to an important point as a newbie. I have felt, for quite some time, that obviously beautiful,stunning,striking scenes are universally recognized/photographed. It is the “hidden in plain sight” and “right under our noses” stuff that once recognized and appreciated deserves to be photographed just as much as the more obvious stuff. (“stuff” is my technical jargon!) Previously I had worried that my fascination with the seemingly mundane was wrong, whatever that means.
    Thanks!

    Reply

    • Anthony Epes
      March 7, 2016 @ 6:35 pm

      They thought Eggleston was crazy too! The mundane is beautiful. Keep looking and finding. Good luck!

      Reply

  3. Dudley Wood
    March 3, 2016 @ 4:31 pm

    Nice article. I’ve always liked Ernst Haas and thought John Szarkowski dismissed him too readily in favour of William Eggleston. Two other photographers’ work I enjoy are Pete Turner and Saul Leiter; plenty of graphic work and unlikely lighting situations.

    Many thanks.

    Reply

    • Anthony Epes
      March 7, 2016 @ 6:38 pm

      Wow. Comparing Haas to Eggleston would not have occurred to me in a million years. Love Turner. Thanks for reading.

      Reply

  4. Dudley Wood
    March 8, 2016 @ 3:43 pm

    I’m a great Haas fan – whenever I see ‘Albuquerque, Route 66 after the thunderstorm’ I have to stop and take a good, long look. Knocks me out every time. Glad I discovered your site (Guardian masterclass); loads of articles for me to read! Many thanks.

    Reply

    • Anthony Epes
      March 8, 2016 @ 3:51 pm

      I’ve been a fan of Haas from my early teens. That image gets me too! It’s shot from in a car and is dark and ominous, but still I want to be there. Enchanting it is.
      Glad you found my site Dudley. Welcome. Please comment freely and often.

      Reply

  5. Sami Serola
    January 12, 2018 @ 8:38 am

    I was looking for famous bullfight pictures taken by Ernst Haas, and found this article. I discovered I have pretty much learned the same things during the past decades. Thank you for the great article.

    Reply

  6. - Cities at Dawn
    September 6, 2018 @ 9:54 am

    […] 13 things Ernst Haas taught me about photography […]

    Reply

  7. What kind of photographer are you? - Cities at Dawn
    November 19, 2018 @ 12:02 pm

    […] 13 things Ernst Haas taught me about photography […]

    Reply

  8. David Murray
    December 14, 2018 @ 3:38 pm

    I too am a disciple of the style of Haas, Egglestone as well as Martin Parr. I am left with the impression that Haas deliberately restricted the focal lengths of his lenses to 28-50-90mm. The photographs I have studied appear to lack the linear distortions one finds in wider or longer focal lengths. For many years I used 35-50-85mm lenses on my Nikon F2 Photomic, but I’ve now sold these as I have discovered the amazingly bright viewfinders of the Leicaflex SL (1968-74). Unlike the SL2 (74-76) the SL bodies are very reasonably priced, easily found in full working order and excellent condition as well. The price of lenses is rising due to the availability of Chinese-made adaptors to enable them to be used on modern digital bodies in stop down metering mode. I’ve now acquired 3 SL bodies, one each for mono, colour print and E6 together with 35-50-90-135-250 lenses. The last two are very heavy and made in Canada. The 250 has a fixed tripod socket and is reserved for cricket matches. I usually carry the first 3 with one body and a monopod. This stuff is amazing. It reminds me of something attributed to Sir Henry Royce (of Rolls Royce): “the quality will remain when the price is forgotten” buy this stuff while you can!

    Reply

    • Mike
      January 10, 2019 @ 6:41 pm

      If you were a disciple of Haas you would be using the best gear possible for the current times. Not ancient film cameras. Haas was about pushing the limits of gear and art. If Haas was doing what you are doing, he would be lugging around a view camera and talking about the good old days….

      Also, who is “Egglestone?” Haven’t heard of that one….must be a new photographer.

      Reply

  9. Todd Weinstein
    February 19, 2019 @ 11:18 pm

    Thank you Anthony for all of the time putting together some of Ernst Haas ideas on photography. Here are some other points of interest…One of the amazing things about Ernst is how he became recognized first in black and white photography with his Homecoming Prisoners of War photo’s taken in Vienna, which was published in Du magazine and shortly after the publication Robert Capa invited him to join the Magaum photo agency Paris After moving to NYC Haas’s color stories were published in life Magazine which had a major influence on many photographers all over the world. Haas had the first one man color photography exhibition in 1962 at MOMA in NYC under Edward Steichen. Steichen had John Sarkowsky hang Ernst’s show then in 1971 Ernst’s The Creation book come out and sold over 350,000 copies..I was very lucky to have been an assistant to Ernst from 1972 up until his death in 1986. I was assistant on projects in many of his workshops we had no secrets. I personally wanted to thank you again in keeping Ernst’s ideas alive.

    Reply

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